Show & tell! met Lili van Wana Bana

Lili is the kind of person that has a spark in her eyes when she starts to talk about Wana BanaShe founded Wana Bana in 2014 because she wanted to have impact in the local economy in her country of origin Colombia. Wana Bana supports sustainable designers, items 100% made in Colombia by singles mothers with scarce resources and returns part of the profit for schooling projects. So here’s a piece of that energy, meeting her for a coffee and talking about her favorite spring items!

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Since I’ve become aware of how bad it is for the environment and developing countries to buy fast fashion, I only buy when it is neccesary. That reduces the shopping opportunities a lot. That means that I can save money to buy great quality (instead of buying 10 shirts of 5 euros that will last only one season, I buy only one timeless piece of 50 euros). I always make a conscious decision when choosing the piece: can I find it in a vintage market? If not, can I buy it from a social responsible brand? These selection process helps me to fall in love with the piece. And because of that I treasure it so I can wear it longer.
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I like to call my bag as my lazy bag: only room for basics (mobile, cards and keys) to keep it simple and light. I bring it when I want to have my hands free: picking up my children, when going to the supermarket. It was handmade in Colombia, where I come from. Nixa Sierra, the designer re-uses vintage magazines and LP covers to give them a second life as bags. The cover she used for this bag I love it because it recalls my childhood: my dad gave me a tv – radio set. Off course it was my first one. With a touch of a botton the screen would go out. It was black and with and the only way to change the channel was by hand. No control remote. I used to sneak out in the school evenings when I was suppose to be asleep to watch my favourite soap-operas.

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My jacket I found it in Nukuhiva. The brand is Rains, it is very difficult to find the sustainable story behind the jacket, but I just love it because is light, water proof and very danish style which makes it very versatile when combining it.

My mantle (underneath the jacket) was a piece I found in Vintage x kilo in the Pijp in Amsterdam. It comes all the way from Tokio Japan. It a stunning oversized cardigan made from wool which I can use as a jacket or a sweater. It feels like carrying my own quilt everywhere keeping me warm during these cold days but having the feeling of being fashionable and sustainable at the same time. 

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My shoes were hand made in Guatemala using natural fibres and textile woven by an indigenous tribe there. They wave their robes with a unique pattern that identifies them from other tribes. Matiosh (which means thank you in Maya) is the brand behind it. They collect the robes and re-use them into these beautiful shoes. Because they are 100% made in Guatemala they support the local economy development and part of the profit goes to school protects there. I love wearing them with basic pieces to enhance it colourful details. 
square1magazine-wanabana1I love wearing two necklaces: one has engraved it my full name, date and time of my birth. So it is 37 years old. A present from my parents. The other one I found it a year ago in New York at a flee market when visiting my favourite jewellery designers Thea Grant and Nico Bazzani. It is made with recycled materials and in the heart is engraved my name initial.

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